Why I Fell In Love With Couchsurfing After It Fell Out of Fashion

We’ve started hosting couchsurfers.

I didn’t think it was possible, since we moved around so much, to find surfers. But it turns out most of these type of travelers don’t book too far in advance anyway. In Vienna I started getting requests daily.

Most of them are students.

Couchsurfing has “gone corporate” so they say because surfers have to pay $25 to contact hosts (hosts don’t pay).

But hosting is way more fun than surfing and here’s why:

You can show someone around or introduce travelers to the city you love. In this case, for me it’s Vienna. I’m not Austrian, but I can serve Almdudler, recommend transportation, and take them to Prater—the outdoor amusement park—like I was.DSC05739

US couchsurfer living in Albania

Ryder loves having other people around to play with and give him attention.

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Four Georgian girls

Jacob and I love having other people around to play with and give us attention. Smile

We like finding a way to give back to our community (the traveling world) and we enjoy the sincere gratitude that those we’ve hosted have shown.

We like experiencing other cultures. I never thought I’d meet someone from Turkmenistan who spoke English, or that a Turkish guy would be showing me how to make menemen-Turkish scrambled eggs.

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Menemen with Musa

We can have the comfort of our own home—our own shower and internet etc—but still meet other people.

And if you ever go back to where they’re from—you’ll have a friend you can meet up with and stay with too!

Getting hosted isn’t half bad either. The memories of Krakow’s central square will fade, but the memories of Ryder playing with his new Polish friends while we share breakfast with our hosts won’t!

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I think everyone should try it. You will love the connections you make.

I hosted one girl and found out only after I accepted that she and I had a mutual friend—they were both Malaysians living in Egypt.

Finding couchsurfing after it’s already been discovered and left behind by a lot of other travelers has been a blessing. We’ll continue it as long as we keep having positive experiences.

Kalli Hiller

Article by Kalli Hiller

Kalli Hiller is a voluntary vagabond who, with her husband Jacob, has traveled full time for the last eight years.

Kalli has written 364 awesome articles for us.

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